Key3 Property Management Group

BIRMINGHAM, MI

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Reliable property management services for busy property owners.

We are a leader in our industry. 

Our service is considered a VALUABLE INVESTMENT by our property owners. NOT an Expense!

Become one of our Happy Property Owners. Contact Us Today!


We are a full service Michigan property

management company that consistently delivers…

  • Shorter Vacancies
  • Better Qualified Tenants
  • Fewer Evictions
  • Higher Rents & Less Maintenance!
  • Expert & Affordable Maintenance
  • Our Clients are thrilled with our service
  • Our Rates are LOW and our Service is HIGH!



What Our Team Can Do For You

Full Service Property Management

"take great care"

Awesome people. Take great care of my properties and keep them rented.                                 ~A.C.

"Very effective and professional"

Great people. They handle all my properties. Best management company I have used. Very effective and professional.                                                 ~S.R.

"Great company"

Great company to work with. They take excellent care of my properties!                             ~ Chris. A.

   "could not be happier"

I have been working with Key3 and could not be happier with the prompt service and organization of the company. Looking forward to working with them.

                                                ~ Allen     

Birmingham, MI Property Management Company

Rent Collections

Each month we will collect rent payment(s) on your behalf and get payment to you in a timely manner. We know how important this is to you so we make it top priority.

Marketing Your Property

We utilize a proven marketing program to attract quality prospective tenants. We take full advantage of many resources to ensure we find a great tenant for your property as quickly as possible.

Property Inspections

We keep an eye on your property to ensure the tenant is taking proper care of your asset and complying with their lease.

Tenant Screening

Qualifying a potential tenant is something we take very seriously.  Nothing is left to chance. All requirements must be met before we will execute a lease on any of our managed properties.

Maintenance & Repairs

We utilize various qualified Independent Contractors for all maintenance and/or repair services. 

Financial Reporting

Detailed financial reports are provided for your review each month, allowing you to track your cash flow and ROI

Our Unique Property Management

What Makes Us The Very Best

Experienced Property Management

Our extensive experience in real estate property management along with our commitment to maximizing the property owner’s ROI makes us one of the most respected and trusted property management companies serving the Oakland and Macomb County areas.

Higher Rents for More Profits

Our comprehensive understanding of the marketplace ensures your rental property will attract the highest rental rate possible along with appropriate rental increases.

Michigan Rental Law Expertise

Complying with the web of federal and state tenancy laws can be very costly for investors.  Our network of attorney's will keep all your rental properties compliant.

Better Tenants = More Cash Flow

Our powerful network of real estate agents & online tenant portals keep your rental property occupied with qualified, pre-screened tenants.

Expert & Affordable Maintenance

We utilize qualified contractors to perform all property maintenance work & keep your rental property running smoothly.  All costs are billed directly to each rental property and displayed on monthly reports.

 We maintain your property’s value.

We secure your ownership rights.

We protect your investment.

Money Back Guarantee!

We enjoy keeping our clients happy and profitable.  That's why we offer a 100% Money Back Guarantee on all services.  Contact us today for full details.

Our extensive experience in real estate property management along with our commitment to maximizing the property owner’s return on investment makes us one of the most respected and trusted property management companies serving the Birmingham, MI area.


We have on staff a real estate broker, a professional marketing and leasing director along with a network of real estate attorneys and property maintenance contractors to bring you maximum value! 


With our professional qualifications, we surpass what most other property managers can provide for you.



Join Our Happy Clients

Our Property Owners Are Thrilled With Us



Contact Us Now For More Info!


~ Confirm the market rate for your rental property.


~ Examine techniques to boost rental income and increase profits.


~ See if your rental property is a good fit for our professional property management services.

Talk to Us About Your Rental Property

Find Out If Key 3 Property Management Is Right For Your Rental Property

Call us to learn more: (586) 307-5424




Birmingham, MI Local

Property Management Experts

We know Birmingham, MI and know we property management

When looking for the right property manager in Birmingham, MI you should seek a property manager who understands the ins and outs of your local market. With our decades of business experience in property ownership, leasing & management, we have the expertise to provide you with quality results. Working with us will maximize your earnings and eliminate the headache of managing your property yourself while providing you with the greatest asset appreciation.


Key 3 Property Management Group's entire staff is very familiar with the local Birmingham marketplace. We carefully monitor market trends and conduct in depth analyses on all the properties we manage.


Relieve yourself of the stress and aggravation the comes from managing your own properties. Contact us today and discover the difference in the quality of your life when you begin working with an experienced property management team that specializes in the Metro Detroit area.


Birmingham, MI Local


Birmingham is a city in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is a northern suburb of Detroit located along the Woodward Corridor (M-1). As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,103.


The area comprising what is now the city of Birmingham was part of land ceded by Native American tribes to the United States government by the 1807 Treaty of Detroit. However, settlement was delayed, first by the War of 1812. Afterward the Surveyor-General of the United States, Edward Tiffin, made an unfavorable report regarding the placement of Military Bounty Lands for veterans of the War of 1812. Tiffin's report claimed that, because of marsh, in this area "There would not be an acre out of a hundred, if there would be one out of a thousand that would, in any case, admit cultivation." In 1818, Territorial Governor Lewis Cass led a group of men along the Indian Trail. The governor's party discovered that the swamp was not as extensive as Tiffin had supposed. Not long after Cass issued a more encouraging report about the land, interest quickened as to its suitability for settlement.


The earliest land entry was made on January 28, 1819, by Colonel Benjamin Kendrick Pierce (brother of future U.S. President Franklin Pierce) for the northwest quarter of section 36. Colonel Pierce visited his land several times, but never settled on it. In March 1818, John W. Hunter and his brother Daniel left Auburn, New York, by sleigh and traveled to Michigan by way of Upper Canada. They waited in Detroit for their father and other family members, who arrived by schooner via Lake Erie in July. The family remained in Detroit until spring 1819, when Hunter made an entry for the northeast quarter of section 36, now in the southeast section of current-day Birmingham. Lacking a proper land survey, Hunter mistakenly built his log house on a tract later purchased by Elijah Willets. That house was later occupied by William Hall, a son-in-law of Elisha Hunter, while John W. Hunter built another log house a short distance to the southeast. On September 25, 1821, Elijah Willets made a land entry for the southwest quarter of section 25. Two days later, Major John Hamilton made an entry for the southeast quarter of section 25. Each of these initial land entries met at what is now the intersection of Maple Road and Pierce Street.


For a time, all three men, John W. Hunter, Hamilton, and Willets, operated hotels and taverns from their houses within a short distance from each other. While Hunter did not continue for very long, Hamilton and Willets continued a rivalry for many years, competing with each other for business from travelers on Woodward Avenue between Detroit and Pontiac. The growing settlement was known variously as "Hamilton's", "Hunter's", or "Willets'"; it was later known as "Piety Hill".


The settlement's original plat was surveyed and recorded on August 25, 1836, in the northwest quarter of section 36, then owned by Rosewell T. Merrill, who also ran the town foundry and the thrashing machine factory. Merrill named his plat "Birmingham" after Birmingham, England; he envisioned that it would also become a great industrial center.[14] Elijah Willets recorded a plat on his property on December 20, 1837. John W. Hunter followed suit with two plats on his property on January 31, 1840, and June 21, 1842, while Major Hamilton laid out a plat on October 7, 1846. Several other properties were subsequently platted as additions. The plats made in 1836 and 1837 were in anticipation of completion of the Detroit and Pontiac Railroad.


Now known as "Birmingham", the village first received mail through the "Bloomfield" post office. Birmingham established its own post office on April 5, 1838. The settlement incorporated as a village in 1864, comprising the northern half of section 36 and the southern half of section 25, with a total land area of one square mile. The first village elections were held March 1, 1864. It was soon governed by a seven-man board of trustees, who appointed a marshal and a treasurer. Birmingham re-incorporated as a city in 1933. Prior to this, the area just north of 14 Mile along Woodward was known as "Eco City".


The names of the city's founders appear throughout Birmingham in civic institutions and commercial businesses: Pierce Elementary School, Hunter House Hamburgers (which was located on the road formerly known as Hunter Boulevard, which bypassed downtown to the east and was renamed Woodward, with the original Woodward Avenue section renamed Old Woodward), Hamilton Hotel, Willets Building, and Merrill Street. Hall & Hunter Realtors adopted their name in honor of the builder and occupier of Birmingham's first home.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.80 square miles (12.43 km2), of which 4.79 square miles (12.41 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.


Birmingham is bordered by Bloomfield Hills on the northwest, Royal Oak on the southeast, Bloomfield Charter Township on the west and north, Southfield Township on the south, and Troy on the northeast.


2010 census data
As of the census of 2010, there were 20,103 people, 9,039 households, and 5,307 families living in the city. The population density was 4,196.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,620.4/km2). There were 9,979 housing units at an average density of 2,083.3 per square mile (804.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.3% White, 3.0% African American, 0.1% Native American, 2.5% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.


There were 9,039 households, of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.3% were non-families. 36.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.96.


The median age in the city was 41.1 years. 24.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.7% were from 25 to 44; 30.1% were from 45 to 64; and 13.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.


Settlers founded the First United Methodist Church in 1821 and conducted services in Elijah Willets' tavern. Its current structure was built in 1839; it is now the oldest church building in the city. Other houses of worship represent many religions.

George H. Mitchell and Almeron Whitehead were two of a small group of bachelors who had formed a club called The Eccentrics; they published a newspaper of the same name, issuing the first edition on May 2, 1878. At a price of 2 cents, The Eccentric provided a "live home paper, replete with all the news of the day", with considerable emphasis on the "local items of importance occurring in Birmingham and immediate vicinity". By the turn of the 20th century, The Eccentric ran advertisements for Detroit stores and theaters, as well as offers of property and houses suitable for the "commuter". In the 1920s, the slogan of The Eccentric was "For a Bigger and Better Birmingham". Today, the Birmingham Eccentric newspaper continues its role as reporter of the community's local news.

In 1923, a group of friends formed The Village Players of Birmingham, a private theatre club. Originally, performances were given in the community house. In 1928 the group commissioned their own theater just outside the downtown area. Today this all-volunteer group is open to everyone and puts on five shows each year.

The community house is a spacious facility with a New England ambience. Many new churches have been started at this location, including the Bloomfield Hills Christian Church. The Ninowskis organized this church in the late 1970s. As the church has grown, it has moved to several other sites. Joe Ninowski Jr, son of the founders, continues in full-time ministry.

In 2008, the Birmingham Little League won the nine- to ten-year-old Little League state championship. The team beat Western Little League 12–5 to earn the title.


Freedom of the Human Spirit by Marshall Fredericks, in Shain Park
The city has more than twenty parks, with many amenities, including tennis courts, baseball diamonds, playgrounds, golf courses, sledding hills, nature trails, picnic areas, and deep woods. Shain Park, the city's main commons, is the site of the Village Fair, art shows, summer music concerts and numerous community events. At the center stands Freedom of the Human Spirit sculpted by Marshall Fredericks.


Schools
The Birmingham City School District administers several nationally accredited schools, including Seaholm High School and Groves High School. Roeper School has a campus on Adams Road.

The Holy Name School is a co-educational parochial school founded by the Roman Catholic Holy Name Church. It educates children grades pre-K to 8. The private school was established in 1928, along with a convent for IHM nuns. (That has since closed.) The church and school continue to operate in conjunction today.

Pierce Elementary School in Birmingham provides classes for elementary school students of the French School of Detroit.

The Japanese School of Detroit (JSD), a supplementary school for Japanese citizens, first began holding classes in Birmingham in 1987, when its operation at Seaholm High started. It began holding classes at Covington School in 1989, and it also had classes at West Maple Elementary. At one point its school offices were in Birmingham. In 2010 the school announced it was moving its operations to Novi.


City of Birmingham, MI Website